New Books and Featured Reading Lists

Each week on the 49th Shelf homepage, we highlight new releases. We also make theme-based lists and showcase lists from guest contributors and 49th Shelf members. This page archives these selections so they are always available to our members.

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New Children's for the week of December 9th : New on Kids' Nonfiction
The Girl Who Rode a Shark

The Girl Who Rode a Shark

And Other Stories of Daring Women
by Ailsa Ross
illustrated by Amy Blackwell
edition:Hardcover
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How Emily Saved the Bridge

How Emily Saved the Bridge

The Story of Emily Warren Roebling and the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover
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I Am a Feminist

I Am a Feminist

Claiming the F-Word in Turbulent Times
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Why Don't Cars Run on Apple Juice?

Why Don't Cars Run on Apple Juice?

Real Science Questions from Real Kids
by Kira Vermond
illustrated by Suharu Ogawa
edition:Hardcover
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Moon Mission

Moon Mission

The Epic 400-Year Journey to Apollo 11
edition:Hardcover
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What the Eagle Sees

What the Eagle Sees

Indigenous Stories of Rebellion and Renewal
edition:Paperback
also available: Hardcover
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My House is a Lighthouse

My House is a Lighthouse

Stories of Lighthouses and Their Keepers
edition:Paperback
tagged : pirates
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New Non-Fiction for the week of December 2nd : New Books on Music
The Awesome Music Project Canada

The Awesome Music Project Canada

Songs of Hope and Happiness
edition:Hardcover
tagged : happiness
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Buffy Sainte-Marie

Buffy Sainte-Marie

The Authorized Biography
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook
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Heart of All Music, The

Heart of All Music, The

Poems About Music and Musicians
edition:Paperback
tagged :
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Jan in 35 Pieces
Excerpt

From "One: Arlequin"

1942

Down London's Baker Street, Jan and his mother, Elf, pick their way around shards of glass and pieces of masonry on their way to Jan's cello lesson. As they pass Madame Tussaud's, Jan notices that a landmark building has disappeared; the skyline beyond Marylebone Road looks different. Instead of the building, there's a gap through which Jan can see a cluster of barrage balloons like giant ears, straining on their ropes.

He walks with his mother in silence. London is often quiet after a bombing. Petrol is rationed and there is little traffic apart from the double-decker buses. They always catch the six a.m. workers' bus from home-the village of Radnage-to High Wycombe. Jan sits with Elf and looks out the window. If his father, Colin, takes him, they sit upstairs where smoking is allowed; the fumes of Woodbines always make Jan's eyes smart. He follows Elf out of the bus and onto the platform, past the poster of a ship sinking under the words "Walls Have Ears", past the old, red machine on the railway platform that reminds Jan of a tomb standing in mute testimony to those golden days of pre-war Rowntrees Chocolate Bar sixpence, then into the 7:15 train from High Wycombe to Marylebone: "Please shew your ticket".

Then they arrive in London and search for breakfast. Jan always makes a game of seeing which café in the district cooks the best dried [powdered] egg. Lyons Corner House is the preferred eatery with their scrambled egg on toast. Once the cashier is paid, Elf and Jan continue on the journey, passing the Royal Academy of Music and turning down Nottingham Place.

Now after Baker Street's gaps and shards of glass, this street is untouched-the same dreary row of townhouses, except the metal railings which used to guide you to their black front doors have been removed to be turned into guns. Jan knocks on 34-the London Cello School.

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The Never-Ending Present

The Never-Ending Present

The Story of Gord Downie and the Tragically Hip
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook Paperback
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Everything Remains Raw

Everything Remains Raw

Photographing Toronto's Hip Hop Culture from Analogue to Digital
edition:Hardcover
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Live at The Cellar

Live at The Cellar

Vancouver’s Iconic Jazz Club and the Canadian Co-operative Jazz Scene in the 1950s and ‘60s
edition:eBook
also available: Paperback Hardcover
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They Shot, He Scored

They Shot, He Scored

The Life and Music of Eldon Rathburn
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover
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Listen Up!

Listen Up!

Recording Music with Bob Dylan, Neil Young, U2, R.E.M., The Tragically Hip, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Tom Waits...
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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Funny books

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Reading Rhinoceroses

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New Non-Fiction for the week of November 25th : New Food and Drink Books
Kitchen Party

Kitchen Party

Effortless Recipes for Every Occasion
edition:Hardcover
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Excerpt

From the Introduction
I love food. That’s probably the most basic and universally agreed-upon statement you’ve ever heard, right? But as clichéd as it might sound, it’s true! I love everything about food—from planning and shopping, to cooking and eating. I love how food has the ability to bring people together, to transport a person from the stresses of their day, and to convey so much love in just a few bites.

The classic kindergarten mantra of “sharing is caring” is something I continue to live by, especially when it comes to food. Cooking, baking, and eating are some of the most social acts that I take part in every day, and I suspect the same might be true for you. Everyone has had days where the only thing that has pulled them out of a slump was baking and eating a whole batch of chocolate chip cookies but, most of the time, we cook for others. My husband, Aaron, often quips that when I’m left to cook only for myself, I eat like a raccoon, grabbing handfuls of pretzels, raw carrot sticks, and spoonfuls of whatever leftovers are hanging around the fridge. For me, half the fun of food is in preparing it for others, so why would I bother whipping up an exciting meal if I’m left to eat it all on my lonesome? In my house, any excuse I can think of is reason enough to invite friends over to share in a meal, grand or humble. Whenever I have people over, the festivities always revolve around the kitchen. No matter the occasion, during at least one point, every single person in attendance will be packed into my tiny scullery, chitchatting away, tasting things here and there, and dipping into the fridge for another drink. This is what I call a kitchen party.

For many Canadians, the term “kitchen party” is evocative of the East Coast. Renowned for their hospitality, good home cooking, and great music, East Coasters are arguably the chief experts in bringing friends and family together for informal parties centered on the heart of the home. In my family, this tradition has evolved from our East Coast roots but really, gathering around the comfort of a hearth of any description is something everyone can relate to. Kitchen parties should be overflowing with great company and good food—food that people want to eat, that might remind them of an old favorite. It should be the type of food that invites you to get your hands dirty, help yourself to a few more forkfuls, and nosh away for hours, surrounded by friends and family.

Kitchen Party: Cooking for Those You Love is here to banish any inflated pomp, circumstance, and anxiety surrounding the idea of inviting people into your home. This is a cookbook to complement parties that last for hours, allowing you to really catch up in the complete comfort of your own home. It’s filled to the brim with family-style dishes for brunches, cocktails, dinners, and special occasions—along with some baked goods and desserts, of course. They’re clear, simple, and straightforward recipes that are grand enough for company, yet easy enough to accomplish on a regular Tuesday night. They’re meant to be plunked down on a table that is groaning under the weight of delicious food and relaxed elbows. Each and every morsel has been put through the rigorous Myra Berg litmus test, meaning that if my wonderful and kitchen-inept mother can make it, anyone can! So go ahead—fill this book with sticky notes, dog-ear the pages, mark it up with pens and some kitchen mess, and try halving your favorite recipes if you’re cooking for smaller numbers.

From my kitchen to yours, Kitchen Party is here to make you look like the culinary wizard I know you are and to help you experience the same joy that I do when I’m cooking for and sharing food with those I love.

Welcome to the party!

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The Long Table Cookbook 

The Long Table Cookbook 

Plant-based Recipes for Optimal Health
edition:Paperback
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tawâw

tawâw

Progressive Indigenous Cuisine
edition:Hardcover
also available: eBook
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Thyme in the Kitchen

Thyme in the Kitchen

Cooking with Fresh Herbs
edition:Paperback
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Valleys of Wine

Valleys of Wine

A Taste of British Columbia's Wine History
edition:Paperback
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Cedar & Salt

Cedar & Salt

Vancouver Island Recipes from Forest, Farm, Field, and Sea
edition:eBook
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Burdock & Co

Burdock & Co

Poetic Recipes Inspired by Ocean, Land & Air
edition:Hardcover
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Excerpt

Preface

Tonight is the sturgeon moon. I get a text from Julie, our manager at Burdock & Co:

hannah says sturgeon moon nite time to let go
of all that burdens you
write it down & submerge
it underwater :)
meet u later?

Yes.

I share the new plan with Gabe and Clea. We are out tonight in Chinatown, feasting and yelling at each other over the noise of the crowded restaurant. Gabe is one of my oldest friends and she now runs Harvest Community Foods, our sister restaurant, and Clea has taken up the task of editing this book. Tonight they are working to get my story out of me. And anyone who knows me knows I hate talking about myself.

Kevin (life partner, business partner, broth transporter, wine deliverer, architect) keeps reminding me I have a great story, and maybe I do, but for me it’s a process, more of a collection of spaces and moments, flavours and techniques that, when stitched together, become what I do, who I am.

From my first naive adventure going out ocean fishing, or discovering thealternative reality of botanicals, or planting gardens, building a bakery, working at great restaurants across the city—all these seemingly disparate events have led to what Burdock & Co is today, and to me sitting in a very loud restaurant trying to write a cookbook!

Julie’s text (thankfully) gives us a new mission for the night, and we escape onto Pender Street. We hatch plans to submerge our burdens. The closest body of water? False Creek. Paper? The sticky notes we’ve been writing recipe ideas down on all night. How do we get the paper to sink? Tie it to a rock.

Halfway to False Creek we stop at Campagnolo Upstairs on Main Street because 1) Gabe needs to pee, 2) while we’re here we might as well have another drink, and 3) we’re waiting for Julie, who’s getting off her shift at Burdock. It’s a precious night off from the restaurant for me, and my fatigue from the week is lifting. I write down my burden(s). It’s a list.

Julie arrives and I ask for butcher’s twine at the bar. The bartender laughs, but returns with four neat lengths of string. We tie our papers around rocks that we picked up on the way, and head out into the end-of-summer night.

We are giddy, happily drunk, walking through the empty streets. This is Vancouver to me, this nexus of Downtown Eastside grit, Chinatown refusing to give up, condos sprouting everywhere, dingy Main Street bars. Harvest is just around the corner on Union, and Burdock is up the hill, past the viaduct.

At the water, a gang of teenagers loiter under the constellation of Science World. A family down the way lights paper lanterns that lift off across the galaxy skyline of Vancouver city lights.

Julie pulls a jar of wine out of her bag and we all take a drink, then throw our burdens into False Creek, wondering if this drunken moon ritual will work. The rocks sink and the lanterns keep rising over us, over Vancouver, one by one, fat, slow stars, competing with the moon.

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Rocky Mountain Cooking

Rocky Mountain Cooking

Recipes to Bring Canada's Backcountry Home
edition:Hardcover
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Excerpt

From the Introduction

During more than twenty years in the industry, I have worked in some incredible backcountry lodges. Every lodge has its own special appeal, but they all offer their guests the prospect of adventure, total immersion in natural beauty, and the option of “unplugging” from daily life. Over the years, I’ve seen time and time again how a first experience of backcountry lodge living usually marks the beginning of a love affair.

What do I mean by “love affair”? I’m talking about the elation you feel, followed by the most wonderful calm, when you’re sitting on top of a mountain in the middle of nowhere. On the way up, you can feel your legs shaking, your lungs burning, and your focus blurring from the strength of the wind. Yet, you keep going, undeterred by elevation or the thought of being able to turnback. Once on top, sitting beside a giant cairn made by everyone who has climbed this peak and added a stone, you feel so proud of yourself and totally aware of your surroundings. The endorphins that are activated after a mountain hike—after any exercise—are all-encompassing and addictive. They make you feel the same as you do after an amazing first date. Many backcountry guests come to the mountains just to experience that feeling of absolute bliss.

My goal with this book is to teach you how to enjoy that feeling of bliss in your own kitchen. No matter where you live, or whether you’ve visited the backcountry, there are remarkable influences from this environment that you can incorporate into your daily cooking. Think of the mountains, the glacial lakes, the carpets of wildflowers, the boulders covered in emerald green lichen—these are the palettes that often inspire me in the kitchen. I’m drawn to the endless varieties of color and texture I’ve encountered during my many hours outdoors, and the memories of them keep me stimulated for hours after I have hung up my hiking boots and placed a gorgeously marinated wild salmon in the oven.

This cookbook contains a collection of diverse and eclectic dishes that I have prepared in many backcountry lodges and huts over the years. You don’t have to be a skier or hiker to enjoy them. The majority of ingredients won’t require you to seek out a specialty grocery store—you will likely find you have most of them at home or that you already shop for them regularly and have been looking for a different way to prepare them.

Use the recipes to inject a little novelty into your daily life. Start your day with a hearty and warming baked French toast casserole with streusel (page 21) or maybe the skillet-baked huevos rancheros (page 31) instead of boiled egg and toast. Enjoy a fabulous salad paired with crispy fried chicken with buttermilk dipping sauce (page 164) for a late lunch. Indulge a craving for the richness of a halibut steak, cooked to perfection and placed atop a bed of roasted asparagus, with pan-fried scallops and a velvety beurre blanc (page 146), to help you forget your troubles at the end of the day.

I’ve also included my best bread recipes, as well as a selection of recipes for delicious cakes, an array of baked goodies, and warming soups to keep on hand. I’m sure that, as you leaf through the pages, you will find something—many things—to prepare that will bring your friends and family to the table to share a meal, talk about your day, or maybe plan your next trip to the great outdoors.

The backcountry can seem hostile or vibrant, overwhelming or inspirational, but however you imagine or experience it, its constant reminders to stay present is its best legacy. If you can nurture that sense of being in the moment in your home and kitchen, I suspect that the peace we can gain from all the natural gifts that the backcountry offers will follow close behind.

So what are you waiting for?

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The 30-Minute Vegetarian Cookbook

The 30-Minute Vegetarian Cookbook

100 Healthy, Delicious Meals for Busy People
edition:Paperback
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You Hold Me Up

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New Non-Fiction for the week of November 18th : New Art Books
Florine Stettheimer

Florine Stettheimer

New Directions in Multimodal Modernism
edition:Paperback
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Michael Snow

Michael Snow

Lives and Works
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover
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Excerpt

Chapter One: Origins

In Michael Snow’s ancestry, the two solitudes of Canada are resolutely conjoined. His father, Gerald Bradley Snow, was of Anglo-Saxon lineage, his mother, Marie-Antoinette, was Quebecois.

Gerald Bradley Snow (1892–1964), later an engineer and a veteran of the First World War (he served in France as a lieutenant in the 48th Highlanders), attended high school at St. Andrew’s in Aurora and then studied at the University of Toronto. More reserved than his classmates, Bradley (the name he used commonly) excelled in school. His son inherited what could be called his artistic side from his mother and his deep understanding of technological complexities and processes from his father. He had an excellent understanding of how things work, of how things fit together.

Bradley Snow was the son of A.J. Russell Snow (1857–1937) and his wife, Katie Beaty (1880–1940). A.J., who was born in Hull (now Gatineau), Quebec, became a lawyer who argued many cases before the Privy Council, served on several royal commissions, and was “Registrar of Alien Enemies” during the Great War.

The father of A.J. Russell Snow was John Allen Snow (1823–78), who was the son of John Snow (1793–c.1823) and Barbara Allen (b. 1799). Barbara was born in Woburn, Massachusetts, and moved to Canada when she was a year old. The move to Canada was initiated by Philomen Wright, a cousin of the Allens. Having acquired the rights to a large parcel of land on the area of the Ottawa River now known as Gatineau, he developed a small colony there. In 1816, when Barbara was seventeen years old, Philomen sent his son Ruggles to England to acquire cattle and engage workmen. There, he hired John Snow, a wheelwright from Chittlehampton, Devon. John and Barbara married on January 4, 1820.

Their son John Allen Snow was educated at St. Lawrence Academy in Potsdam, New York, and trained as a surveyor after he returned to Canada. He married Emma Catherine Bradley in 1850. Three years earlier, he became deputy provincial surveyor and mapped portions of, among other places, Muskoka. He was later sent by John A. Macdonald to survey the land that was under dispute in Manitoba during the Riel Rebellion.

Katie Beaty was the daughter of James Beaty (1831–99), who had been born at Ashdale Farm in the township of Trafalgar in the county of Halton, Ontario. James’s father, John (d. 1870), had immigrated to Canada from County Cavan in Ireland. James, who married his cousin Fanny Beaty in 1858, served as mayor of Toronto from 1879 to 1880 and was the founder of the newspaper, the Toronto Leader. He published one book, the Quaker-inspired Paying the Pastor: Unscriptural and Traditional(1885).

A.J. Russell and Katie Snow had seven children: Gerald Bradley, Kallie, Beaty, Geoffrey, Enid, Dimple, and Rhoda. When Geoffrey was killed in action at the Battle of the Somme during the Great War, Bradley might have been fundamentally shaken.

Early on, the Beaty side of Michael Snow’s ancestry made a name for itself in journalism and politics. The Snow side also produced a very distinguished attorney. Similar claims hold true for the artist’s mother’s family.

* * *

Marie-Antoinette Françoise Carmen Lévesque (1904–2004) was an outgoing and vibrant woman; a classically trained pianist, she had a passion for the arts. One of four children, she had two brothers, Marcel (1908–79) and Robert (1917–2005), and a younger sister, Pierette (c.1906–19), who died at a convent school (Saint Joseph Academy) in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Along with her talent as a pianist, she was also particularly adept at languages: she taught herself Spanish, Portuguese, and Russian. She was so skilled in Spanish that she was later employed to host a Spanish-language radio program for the Spanish consulate in Toronto. Their father was Elzéar Lévesque (1875–1937), the son of Delphine Tremblay and boat captain Elzéar Lévesque. The younger Elzéar studied at the Séminaire de Chicoutimi and law at Laval University. In 1884 he married Caroline Denechaud (1875–1942), daughter of Macaire Denechaud, a merchant, and Françoise Moreau.

Elzéar was a candidate in the provincial election of 1908 and the federal one of 1911. In 1922 he founded the Compagnie Autobus & Taxis 500. Later, he invested in the Compagnie Hydraulique du Saguenay; throughout his lifetime, he was active in the real estate development of Saint-Ambroise, Saint-Honoré, Chicoutimi, and Jonquière. He was the mayor of Chicoutimi from 1912 to 1922.

Caroline Denechaud was one of sixteen children born to Macaire and Françoise. Marie-Antoinette’s paternal great-grandfather was the Hon. Claude Denechaud, a representative for Quebec City in the province’s legislature. His father, Jacques Denechaud, a surgeon, arrived in Quebec from France in 1752 and was on duty at the hospital when the English won the Battle of the Plains of Abraham.

In Chicoutimi, Elzéar and Caroline’s majestic house, a large brick structure on a hill, was surrounded by a low stone wall. Earlier, in 1912, Elzéar had built an island cottage at Lac Clair; when that burned down in 1918, he built a similar one, facing the other way, on the same island. Elzéar was a person who sought out the best. He had a superb wine cellar and assembled a large collection of books related to all things French.

After completing his studies in Toronto, Bradley worked as a surveyor in the Saguenay region of Quebec; his assignment was to prepare a report on the feasibility of building a rail line from Chibougamau to Chicoutimi (about 350 kilometres) — the project was not undertaken. A bit later, around 1924, he became the chief engineer and head of construction of two bridges in Chicoutimi, where he then resided.

He and Marie-Antoinette met at a ball given by Sir William Price, the Quebec-based lumber merchant. The two fell in love and decided to marry. When Marie-Antoinette told her father that she and Bradley intended to marry, Elzéar received communications and in-person visits from the local Catholic hierarchy, which threatened his daughter with excommunication if she married a Protestant. Despite the Church’s warnings, she went to Toronto, and there she and Bradley wed on October 29, 1924, with his family in attendance.

The strong bond between the young couple was possibly triggered because each had lost a sibling. In Marie-Antoinette’s case, her parents had taken her and her sister by train to the school in Massachusetts. When, after three months at the school, her sister was taken ill with the Spanish flu and died suddenly, her parents returned to the States to take their surviving daughter back to Chicoutimi.

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The Group of Seven Reimagined

The Group of Seven Reimagined

Contemporary Stories Inspired by Historic Canadian Paintings
edited by Karen Schauber
edition:Hardcover
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Light Revealed

Light Revealed

Scratchboard Engravings by Scott McKowen
illustrated by Scott McKowen
introduction by Peter Hinton
edition:Hardcover
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FLUEVOG

FLUEVOG

50 Years of Unique Soles for Unique Souls
edition:Hardcover
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Ruling Out Art

Ruling Out Art

Media Art Meets Law in Ontario’s Censor Wars
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook Hardcover
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Unbecoming Nationalism

Unbecoming Nationalism

From Commemoration to Redress in Canada
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
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The Story of Painting

The Story of Painting

How art was made
by DK
foreword by Ross King
edition:Hardcover
tagged : painting
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This week's recommended reading lists

Women Who Work

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